COURSE:      HUMN 2103—WESTERN HUMANITIES:  ANCIENT & MEDIEVAL

 

PROFESSOR:           Dr. Doug Baker

Office Hours:              To be Announced

Office Phone:              945-3235

E-Mail Address:          dr.baker@okstate.edu

Home Page:                 www.osuokc.edu/bdougla

 

COURSE DESCRIPTION: Key ideas and values of modern western cultures, as seen in their historical and philosophical context.

 

TEXT:            Lamm, Robert C.  The Humanities in Western Culture.  McGraw-Hill, 2004.  ISBN:  0-07-283598-2.

 

GENERAL EDUCATION GOALS:

 

Upon completion of General Education Curriculum, students should be proficient in demonstrating the following competencies:

 

Goal #1:  Critical Thinking

 

Explanation:

 

Critical thinking skills include, but are not limited to, the ability to comprehend complex ideas, data, and concepts; to make inferences based on careful observation; to make judgments based on specific and appropriate criteria; to solve problems using specific processes and techniques; to recognize relationships among the arts, culture, and society; to develop new ideas by synthesizing related and/or fragmented information; to apply knowledge and understanding to different contexts, situations, and/or specific endeavors; and to recognize the need to acquire new information.

 

*All courses will contain assignments that demonstrate critical thinking, but not all courses will include all listed critical thinking elements.

 

Goal #2:  Effective Communications

 

Explanation:

 

Effective communication is the ability to develop organized, coherent, unified written or oral presentations for various audiences and situations.

 

Goal #3:  Computer Proficiency

 

Explanation:

 

Computer proficiency includes a basic knowledge of operating systems, word processing, and Internet research capabilities.

 

Goal #4:  Civic Responsibility

Explanation:

 

Preparation for civic responsibility in the democratic society of the United States includes acquiring knowledge of the social, political, economic, and historical structures of the nation in order to function effectively as citizens in a country that is increasingly diverse and multicultural in its population and more global in its view and functions.

 

Goal #5:  Global Awareness

 

Explanation:

 

Global awareness includes knowledge of the geography, history, cultures, values, ecologies, languages, and present-day issues of different peoples and countries, as well as an understanding of the global economic, political, and technological forces which define the interconnectedness and shape the lives of the world’s citizens.

 

COURSE OBJECTIVES:

 

The student who successfully completes the course should be able to:

 

1.         Recognize, recall, and relate the major socio-geographical-political events and figures; major artistic movements, works, and artists; major literary movements, works, and authors; and major philosophical/religious movements and figures in those cultures studied.

 

2.         Recognize and identify the interrelationships among the various socio-geographical-political, creative, and philosophical developments in those cultures studied.

 

3.         Examine, recognize, and relate basic human concerns and the common humanity that links people of all times.

 


GENERAL INFORMATION:

 

1.         Prerequisites:  ENGL 1113 (Freshman Composition I)

 

2.         Next Course in Sequence:  HUMN 2203:  Modern Western Humanities

 

3.         Instruction Methods:  This is a lecture-discussion class which places a high value on class discussions.  In addition, some class time is used for project presentations.

 

4.         Special Information:  Class participation is encouraged, but talking among yourselves during the lecture is not acceptable.  OSU-OKC policy prohibits the presence of food and drink in the classroom.  Also, please remember that all buildings on our campus are tobacco free.  Students who persistently disrupt a class or flagrantly violate OSU-OKC policy may be asked to leave the classroom.

 

5.         Attendance:  Students are held accountable for all work covered in a course despite valid reasons for absence from class.  Students are expected to attend each class period. Regular attendance is necessary for a student to earn a good grade.  Also, experience demonstrates that regular attendance is a positive factor in promoting more frequent and higher quality class discussions, which are a crucial part of the educational process.  See #4 under “Course Requirements” for the details of the attendance policy in this class.

 

6.         Honors Credit:  A student who meets the following criteria may receive Honors credit by completing a Request for Honors Credit by Contract-Conditions form with the instructor’s permission and submitting it to the Program Coordinator.  The student must achieve a “B” or above and satisfactorily complete the contract to earn Honors designation for the course.  It is the Program Coordinator who must determine the eligibility of the student for the Honors Contract before the Contract is completed by the student and the instructor.

 

            Requirements for New Freshmen:  ACT composite score of 23 or higher, or a high school grade point average of 3.5 or higher.

 

            Requirements for Students Other than New Freshman:  (a) If a student other than a new freshman has completed fewer than 30 credit hours, he/she must have at least a 3.0 retention grade point average; (b) If a student other than a new freshman has completed 30 or more credit hours, he/she must have at least a 3.25 retention grade point average.       

           

            Special Cases:  Students who do not meet the eligibility requirements may petition the Honors Committee by first contacting the Program Coordinator for an exception to the minimum GPA requirement.  Consideration of the petition will be based upon performance during the prior semester at OSU-OKC.

 

7.         Academic Dishonesty or Misconduct:  Academic dishonesty or misconduct is not condoned nor tolerated at institutions within the Oklahoma State University system.  Academic dishonesty is behavior in which a deliberately fraudulent misrepresentation is employed in at attempt to gain undeserved intellectual credit, either for oneself or for another.  Academic misconduct is behavior that results in intellectual advantage obtained by violating a specific standard, but without deliberate intent or use of fraudulent means.  Academic dishonesty or misconduct cases are governed by the OSU-OKC Campus Student Rights and Responsibilities Code.  Copies of the Student Rights and Responsibilities can be obtained from the Student Activities and Campus Life Office or an electronic version is also available online at http://www.osuokc.edu/rights.

 

8.         Withdrawal Policy:  Any student may withdraw from this class or change to audit on or before the published drop date, which is the Friday of the twelfth (12th) week of the semester (the sixth week of the summer semester).  Withdrawals must be processed through the Admissions Office and requires the signature of an advisor within the division.  All students remaining on the class roll after the published drop date will receive a letter grade in the course.


9.         Incomplete Grades:  The Incomplete grade (I) may be given only to a student who has completed at least 70% of the course work, is passing, and has a valid excuse for being unable to complete the course.  It is the student's responsibility to contact the instructor, who will complete an "I" contract, stipulating the work that must be made up and the time allowed to do so, for both of you to sign.

 

10.       Americans with Disabilities Act Statement:  If any member of the class feels that he/she has a disability and needs special accommodations of any nature whatsoever, the instructor will work with you and the Office of the Vice President for Student Affairs to provide reasonable accommodations to ensure that you have a fair opportunity to perform in this class after the disability has been verified.  Please advise the instructor of such disability and the desired accommodations at some point before, during, or after the first scheduled class period.

 

COURSE REQUIREMENTS:

 

1.         Exams:  There will be a total of four (4) exams in this course, including the Final Exam, with a total possible of 500 exam points.  Each of the first three (3) exams will be worth a maximum of 100 points.  (See below for information on the Final Exam.) Each exam except the Final Exam will consist of matching, multiple choice, map work, and essay questions.

 

2.         Final Exam:  The Final Exam is comprehensive in scope, covering the entire semester course.  It contains 100 objective questions with no map work or essay questions.  If a student has taken all three of the regular exams, the Final Exam will be worth a maximum of 200 points, 2 points per question.

 

            The student must take the Final Exam at the regularly scheduled time or make arrangements with the professor before the Final Exam Week.  Failure to do this may result in a "0" for the missed Final Exam.

 

3.         Make-Up Policy:  There are no actual make-up exams available in this class.  Instead, if you miss one of the first three (3) exams, the Final Exam will be worth a maximum of 300 points, 3 points per question.  If you miss two of the first three (3) exams, then the Final Exam will be worth a maximum of 400 points, 4 points per question, and so on.

 

4.         Attendance Policy:  There is NO such thing as an excused or unexcused absence in this class; instead, an absence is simply an absence.

 

            To encourage high attendance, if a student has perfect attendance between any two exams (or between the 1st day and the 1st exam), except before the Final Exam, the first five (5) questions a student misses will NOT be counted wrong.  If a student has perfect attendance between the 3rd exam and the Final Exam, the first ten (10) questions a student misses will NOT be counted wrong.  Also, if a student is absent only once between the 3rd exam and the Final Exam, the first five (5) questions a student misses will NOT be counted wrong.  Moreover, if a student misses fewer questions than allowed for attendance reasons, he/she will then earn extra credit so that the score will be greater than 100% for the given exam.

 

NOTE:  In Summer school, attendance will be taken during each half of the break, so that each half-class will constitute one (1) session.

 

5.         Student Project:  Each student will be required to complete a project of his/her own choosing.  The project should relate to the contents of this course.  A student may write a research paper or an extended essay; however, I would encourage hands-on projects of your own creation.  The student project will be worth a maximum of up to 50 points.

 

a.  Papers

 

Any papers should be at least 8-10 pages in length, typed and double-spaced, with page numbers at the bottom center of each page.  A title page (not counted in the number of pages) should give (1) the title of your paper; (2) a formal statement about whose class it is for; (3) your name; and (4) the identity of the university and semester.  See a sample title page on page 9 (unnumbered) of this syllabus.  Your paper should include a bibliography page with at least 5 different sources.  It also needs to be properly placed in a folder (secured folder, not a file folder)C5% of the grade.  Spelling, punctuation, and grammar will count for 20% of the grade, so proof-read carefully before submitting it.  The other 75% of the grade will be determined on the basis of (1) relevant facts included (or excluded); (2) the degree of how well the thoughts and facts were organized; and (3) the degree of clarity of your conclusions or other points.

 

b.  Hands-on Projects                         

Hands-on projects should reflect several hours of work, and should be accompanied by a minimum 2-page written description of what the student has created, and/or how he/she created it.  This report should include some basic facts from the research you had to do in order to complete the project, including a bibliography of at least 2 sources.  The written description should be typed, double-spaced, and contain your name prominently at the top.  Do not use kits which have done part of the work for you; this hands-on project is your creation!  The major determining factor in the grade for the hands-on project is the degree of effort/work reflected in the project.  (Those whose projects look like they took an hour or two to complete will be graded poorly!  So choose your project carefully and do not do a hasty, or a quick, job.)

 

All student projects must be approved by submitting an informal written proposal on a 3" x 5" index card.  The student project will be worth 50 points, so do not delay in getting your project approved!  The deadline for getting your project approved is no later than the end of the 5th week of the semester (2nd week in a Summer semester).  And the deadline for completing the project and turning it in is no later than the end of the 10th week of the semester (5th week in a Summer semester).  Late projects will be reduced by 10 points for every calendar week day they are late!  (Late proposal cards will result in 5 points reduced on your project grade for every calendar weekday they are late!)

 

EVALUATION:

 

The grading scale for this course is as follows:

 

A = 90% - 100%

B = 80% -   89%

C = 70% -   79%

D = 60% -   69%

F =    0% -   59%

 

HOW TO ACCESS FINAL GRADES:

 

Final grades will be available online after the Final Exam Week of the semester.  Follow the steps outlined below to access your Final Grade at that time:

 

1.                  Go to www.osuokc.edu

2.                  Click on “My OSU-OKC Student Portal” at the left of the screen

3.                  Click on the "Student Resources" tab at the top of the screen

4.                  Click on “Student Information System” in the list of Institution Services

5.                  Click on “Access Student Account” in the list

6.                  On the “Student Login” screen, enter your Student I.D. and your PIN number according to the following directions:

 

a.         Student I.D. is your Social Security number

b.         PIN is a 6-digit number of your birthday (with NO dashes or slash marks—Example = 051386 if your birthday is May 13, 1986)

c.         NOTE:  When you enter the 1st time, immediately change your PIN according to directions on the “Change Pin” screen.

 

After logging in, go to the “Student Services” screen and click on “Grades”

 

 

INSTITUTIONAL STATEMENT:

 

Each student is responsible for being aware of the information contained in the OSU-OKC Catalog, Student Handbook, and semester information listed in the Class Schedule. 

 

SYLLABUS MODIFICATION STATEMENT:

 

Faculty has the right to change or modify the course syllabus materials during the academic year.  Any changes will be provided in a written, dated addendum to the course syllabus.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

FLOOD LEGENDS

 

 

 

 

 

 

SUBMITTED TO

 

DR. DOUG BAKER

 

in partial fulfillment of the requirements

 

for the course, HUMN 2103:  Western Humanities:  Ancient & Medieval

 

 

 

 

 

 

BY

 

JANE DOE

 

 

 

 

 

 

OKLAHOMA STATE UNIVERSITY-OKLAHOMA CITY

 

SPRING 2008

 

 

 

 

 

KEYS TO SUCCESSFUL LEARNING

 

 

1.         ATTENDANCE

 

2.         ORGANIZATION

 

Between each time the class meets you should:

 

·         Type your lecture notes on a computer, reorganizing them by

 

(1)  making the headings & sub-headings stand out.

(2)  numbering or bulleting listed items.

(3)  highlighting key names and terms.

(4)  leaving sufficient space between items and sections to avoid confusion in identifying information in your notes.

 

NOTE:  Make a back-up copy of your typed notes on the computer, and print the notes off each time, placing them in a 3-ring notebook.

 

·         Identify all items discussed in class on the appropriate Review Sheet, and follow the recommendations exactly for using the Review Sheet.  NOTE:  Remember to do any textbook items also—which requires that you keep up with class discussions and be aware of the chapter readings in the course syllabus.

 

·         At least skim read the appropriate textbook chapter for the next lecture—which also requires that you keep up with class discussions and be aware of the chapter readings in the course syllabus.

 

3.         TIME

 

It is estimated that college students should spend 2-3 hours outside of actual class time for every hour spent in class.  NOTE:  This requires a careful evaluation of your personal schedule (e.g., family, work, school, etc.) and making any appropriate adjustments in order to have this much time.

 

 


COURSE OUTLINE:

 

I.          Unit 1—Ancient River-Valley Civilizations

 

Chapter 1:  The Emergence of Early Culture (Mesopotamia)

Chapter 2:  Egypt: Land of the Pharaohs

 

Lecture Topics:

 

 

 

Introduction to Humanities

The Neo-Babylonian Empire

Introduction to Chronology

The Persian Empire

Introduction to Pre-History

Introduction to Egypt

Experts and the Establishment

Outline of Political Periods

Introduction to Mesopotamia

The Old Kingdom

Flood Traditions

The Second Intermediate Period

Old Babylonia

The New Kingdom

The Assyrian Empire

Egypt Loses Its Glory

 

 

II.        Unit 2—Greece:  Birthplace of Western Civilization

 

Chapter 3:  The Aegean Heritage

Chapter 4:  Early Greece: Preparation for the Good Life

Chapter 5:  Hellenic Athens: The Fulfillment of the Good Life

Chapter 6:  Greece: From Hellenic to Hellenistic World

Chapter 7:  The Greek Arts

 

Lecture Topics:

 

 

 

Introduction to Greece

Greek Theater

Mcyenaean Civilization

The Age of Pericles

Influence of Mainland Greek Geography

The Big 3 Philosophers

Greek Religion

Other Notable Greek Scholars

Introduction to the Archaic Period

The Peloponnesian War

The Persian Invasions

The Hellenistic Era

Early Greek Philosophy

Greek Music

 

 

III.       Units 3 & 4—Rome: The International Culture AND Judaism and Christianity

 

Chapter 8:  A Thousand Years of Rome

Chapter 9:  Roman Art and Architecture: The Arts of Megalopolis

Chapter 10:  The Star and the Cross

Chapter 11:  The Beginnings of Christian Art

 

Lecture Topics:

 

 

 

Introduction to Rome

Roman Literature

Introduction to the Roman Republic

Roman Architecture

Military History of the Republic

Roman Contributions to W Civilization

Julius Caesar

Introduction to Judaism

Introduction to the Roman Empire

Post-Biblical Judaism

Decline and Fall of the Roman Empire

Introduction to Christianity

Roman Religion

Jewish-Christian Relations

Roman Philosophy

 

 

                                                                       

IV.       Unit 5—The Age of Faith

 

Chapter 12:  Building Medieval Walls

Chapter 13:  The Late Middle Ages: Expansion and Synthesis

Chapter 14:  The Medieval Synthesis in Art

 

           

Lecture Topics:

 

 

 

Introduction to the Middle Ages

Literature of the Late Middle Ages

Feudalism

The Holy Crusades

Church Authority

The Battle of Universals

Rise of the Papacy

Medieval Universities

The Rise of Islam

The Church in Turmoil

The Carolingians

Medieval Cathedrals

Introduction to the Late Middle Ages

 

 

                                                                                   

HOW TO STUDY FOR DR. BAKER'S HUMANITIES EXAMS

 

Four Review Sheets are included within this course syllabus.  Each Review Sheet (except the last one) contains four (4) sections.  Please note the comments and suggestions on each of those sections below:

 

1.         Identifications:  25 items are listed in this section on each of the first three Review Sheets.  I recommend that you use 3” x 5” index cards.  Head each one up with the name of the Identification and summarize just the basic “bare bones” information on 1 side of the card only.  On the Final Exam, each Identification item on the Final Exam Review Sheet will appear in a Matching section.

 

2.         Textbook Identifications:  See #1 above—The only difference is that these are items that will not be discussed in class; so you must get the information from the textbook.  There are 7 of these items on each of the first three exams.  The number in parenthesis following each of these items represents the chapter number where you can find information about them in the textbook.

 

3.         Map:  Each of the first 3 exams will have 1 map, on which the student needs to identify the correct location of a city, nation, river, sea, valley, mountain, island, etc.  The places listed on the "Map” section of the Review Sheet are those which you will need to know—along with the page number of the map in the text for you to study.  I recommend that you trace each map using tracing paper.  Then make several photocopies of the traced map on which you should practice until you know them well.  NOTE:  A few students look at a blank map on my exams and see nothing but crooked lines, and they freak out and mess up the entire map portion.  So please follow my recommendations on how to prepare for the map portion of the exams!

 

4.         Essays:  10 essay questions are listed on each of the first 3 Review Sheets.  On each of the first 3 exams, 5 of the questions will appear on each exam, and you will need to choose 3 of those 5 questions to answer.  For these items, I also recommend using 3" x 5" index cards.  Head each one up with 1 or more key words which describe the Essay topic.  Then limit yourself to what was discussed in class—and only that portion which specifically answers the question on the Review Sheet.  WARNING:  Please prepare as if you had to answer all 10 essay questions on a Review Sheet because each one will also be converted into at least 1 multiple choice question on the first three exams.  On the Final Exam, there will be an average of 2 multiple choice questions derived from each essay on the Final Exam Review Sheet.

 

 

These guidelines have been proven to work.  IF YOU IGNORE THEM—OR CHANGE THEM—YOU MAY BE DOING SO TO THE PERIL OF YOUR OWN EXAM GRADE!!!

 

 

REVIEW SHEET #1

 

Identifications

 

Textbook I.D.s

Map—Page 11

 

 

 

 

Humanities

Hanging Gardens

Standard of Ur (1)

Tigris River

Pre-History

Cyrus

Sargon II (1)

Euphrates River

Rationalists

Royal Road

Ishtar Gate (1)

Mesopotamia

Mesopotamia

Egypt

The Sphinx (2)

Fertile Crescent

Culture

“Gift of the Nile

Great Pyramid (2)

Babylon (city)

Sumer

Amon-Re

Amarna Style (2)

 

Cuneiform

Hieroglyphs

King Tut (2)

Nile River

Theocracy

Rosetta Stone

 

Upper Egypt

Ziggurat

Memphis

 

Lower Egypt

Assyrians

Pyramid Age

 

Red Sea

Nineveh

Hyksos

 

Mediterranean Sea

Nebuchadnezzar

 

Thutmose III

Amenhotep IV

 

 

                                                           

Essays

 

1.         Explain C-14 dating in simple terms.  Identify the key assumption behind it, and give the oldest historically known date which can confirm the accuracy of C-14 dating.

2.         Identify the 2 major sources of information on pre-history; in general, tell what they suggest about pre-history.  Then list the 3 options for interpreting that information.

3.         What is the Establishment in any field, and how does it control “truth?”  Give brief examples of Establishment “truth” that are not truth.

4.         Name the 2 most famous Flood legends.  List the 3 points of agreement among nearly all Flood legends.  Then list the 3 options for interpreting those legends.

5.         Summarize the contributions of Sumer to world culture.

6.         Identify Hammurabi and his Code.  Identify the main principle behind it and the main significance of the Code.

7.         Briefly discuss Zoroaster (include his nationality & century) and what he did.  Identify the main theme in his ideas, and then give the central emphasis of those ideas.

8.         Contrast the different effect that geography had on Mesopotamian and Egyptian civilizations.

9.         Describe the Egyptian perspective on death, including the concept of Ka and its relationship to mummification.

10.       List the 6 political periods of ancient Egypt.

 

 

REVIEW SHEET #2

 

 

Identifications

 

Textbook I.D.s

Map—Page 43

 

 

 

 

Greece

Pythagoras

Sophocles (5)

Crete

Minoans

Democritus

Idealism (7)

Peloponnesus

Mycenaeans

Pericles

Naturalism (7)

Athens

Homer

Protagoras

Acropolis (7)

Aegean Sea

Olympic Games

Socrates

Doric Order (7)

Asia Minor

Athens

Aristotle

Ionic Order (7)

 

Kleisthenes

Herodotus

Corinthian Order (7)

 

Sparta 

Hippocrates

 

 

Marathon

Archimedes

 

 

Salamis

Peloponnesian War

 

 

Plataea

Alexander

 

 

Thales

Hellenism

 

 

Logos

 

 

 

                                                                                   

Essays:

 

1.         Discuss the background of the Trojan War (e.g., its cause, the century, etc.).  Then tell who won and how they won.

2.         Discuss Greek geography and climate, and their effect on the development of Greek civilization.

3.         Identify the 4 ways that Greek religion was different from other religions.  Then briefly give their view of the gods, and name the 3 greatest gods of Greek culture.

4.         Discuss and contrast the 3 beliefs which separated the Greeks from the Mesopotamians and the Egyptians.

5.         Describe the ancient Greek view of what happens after human death.  Be certain to use and describe all special terms.

6.         Who were the pre-Socratics?  How did most of them view the universe?  And what belief did they all share in common?

7.         Describe the origin and physical setting and structure of the Greek theater.  Then briefly list the other major facts discussed in class.

8.         Compare and contrast the metaphysical philosophies of Plato and Aristotle.  Include “The Myth of the Cave” and the terms forms, universals, and particulars in your explanation.

9.         Identify and outline the 3 major Hellenistic schools of philosophy.  Be certain to identify the famous philosopher for each school.

10.       Describe the Greek attitude toward music.  Then name and briefly describe the 3 musical instruments discussed in class.

 

 

REVIEW SHEET #3

 

Identifications

 

Textbook Identifications

 

 

 

Romulus

Mithraism

Catacombs (11)

Tarquin the Proud

Constantine

Christian Sculpture (11)

Patricians

Theodosius I

Basilica (11, cf. p. 230)

Plebeians

Neoplatonism

Nave (11, cf. p. 230)

Consuls

Tacitus

Transept (11, cf. p. 230)

Senate

Circus Maximus

Apse (11, cf. p. 230)

Tribune

Jacob

Frescoes (11)

Punic Wars

Diaspora

 

Julius Caesar

Second Temple

Map—Page 132

Caesar Augustus

Torah

 

Pax Romana

Christ

Rome

Marcus Aurelius

Paul

Carthage

Vandals

 

Spain

 

 

Gaul (or Gallia)

 

 

Constantinople

                                               

Essays:

 

1.         Identify the Golden Age of Rome, its emperor, and his major accomplishments.

2.         List the 5 reasons for the decline and fall of the Roman Empire and the official date for its fall.

3.         Briefly describe Rome’s relationship with Jews and then Christians before A.D. 313.

4.         List and explain the 5 basic reasons that Christianity finally succeeded in the 4th century.

5.         Outline the 3 best periods of Roman literature, giving the name, time period, and one important literary figure for each period.

6.         Discuss the architecture and purposes of the Roman Colosseum, and gives its original name and meaning.

7.         List and briefly discuss the major points and sub-points of the Roman contributions to Western civilization.

8.         Give a brief description of each of the following items related to post-Biblical Judaism:  (a) Rabbis; (b) Pharisees; (c) Sadducees; (d) Tanakh; and (e) Talmud.

9.         List and describe the 4 unique aspects of Judaism.

10.       What were the basic factors that resulted in anti-Semitism among Christians?  And how was that anti-Semitism expressed in terms of Christian worship?

 

 

REVIEW SHEET FOR FINAL EXAM

 

Identifications

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Mesopotamia

Protagoras

Middle Ages

Dante 

Sumer 

Socrates

Lord-Vassal

Holy Crusades

Cuneiform

Peloponnesian War

Peasants/Serfs

Thomas Aquinas

Nebuchadnezzar

Hellenism

Manor (God’s Acre)

Universities

Cyrus

Acropolis (7)

Augustine

Babylonian Captivity

Egypt

Romulus

Church/State/Natural

 

Amon-Re

Julius Caesar

Muhammad

 

Rosetta Stone

Pax Romana

Mecca

 

Thutmose III

Constantine

Quran

 

Amarna Style (2)

Theodosius I

Hadith

 

Greece

Neoplatonism

Islam

 

Homer

Tacitus

Caliph

 

Marathon

Paul

Charlemagne

 

Thales 

Catacombs (11)

Beowulf

 

Pericles

Basilica (11)   

Song of Roland

 

 

Essays

 

1.         Identify the 2 major sources of information on pre-history; in general, tell what they suggest about pre-history.  Then list the 3 options for interpreting that information.

2.         Name the 2 most famous Flood legends.  List the 3 points of agreement among nearly all Flood legends.  Then list the 3 options for interpreting those legends.

3.         Identify Hammurabi and his Code.  Identify the main principle behind it and the main significance of the Code.

4.         Contrast the different effect that geography had on Mesopotamian and Egyptian civilizations.

5.         Describe the Egyptian perspective on death, including the concept of Ka and its relationship to mummification.

6.         Discuss the background of the Trojan War (e.g., its cause, the century, etc.).  Then tell who won and how they won.

7.         Identify the 4 ways that Greek religion was different from other religions.  Then briefly give their view of the gods, and name the 3 greatest gods of Greek culture.

8.         Describe the origin and physical setting and structure of the Greek theater.  Then briefly list the other major facts discussed in class.

9.         Compare and contrast the metaphysical philosophies of Plato and Aristotle.  Include “The Myth of the Cave” and the terms forms, universals, and particulars in your explanation.

10.       Describe the Greek attitude toward music.  Then name and briefly describe the 3 musical instruments discussed in class.

11.       List the 5 reasons for the decline and fall of the Roman Empire and the official date for its fall.

12.       Discuss the architecture and purposes of the Roman Colosseum, and gives its original name and meaning.

13.       List and briefly discuss the major points and sub-points of the Roman contributions to Western civilization.

14.       List and describe the 4 unique aspects of Judaism.

15.       What were the basic factors that resulted in anti-Semitism among Christians?  And how was that anti-Semitism expressed in terms of Christian worship?

16.       Give a brief description of how the Dark Ages began.  Then define feudalism and give the significance of medieval walls.

17.       Define and discuss the origin of apostolic succession.  Then explain its relationship to Church Tradition and the Bible.

18.       Discuss the concepts of infused grace, meritorious works, and purgatory.  Don’t forget to list a few examples of meritorious works and how one can reduce his soul’s time in purgatory.

19.       How did Augustine bring Plato into the Christian Church, and what was its impact on medieval scholasticism?

20.       Discuss the rise of the Papacy in terms of the Petrine doctrine, the general political context, and the role of France.  Then identify the century that the Papacy was fully established.

21.       Outline and briefly describe the 5 Pillars of Islam and the concept of Jihad.

22.       Define and describe an Islamic mosque from an architectural and artistic perspective (see Chapter 12).

23.       Outline and briefly discuss the major reasons for the coming of the Late Middle Ages and the rise of cities.

24.       Define the Battle of Universals and identify the 3 major positions.  Then tell how Thomas Aquinas resolved it, and give the significance of the resolution.

25.       Contrast the major architectural features of Romanesque and Gothic cathedrals.